EDWARD R. MURROW: A REPORTER REMEMBERS {1939-1945} (RADIO)

Summary

In 1946, before Edward R. Murrow returned to the United States, the British Broadcasting Company asked him to reflect on his experiences as a reporter covering the war in London. Famous for his "This ... is London" radio broadcasts during World War II, Murrow shares his observations and personal reflections on the war in this radio compilation, which includes many excerpts from his hundreds of wartime broadcasts. Murrow begins the program by explaining his initial attitude toward England, her people, and her history and future. The program is then devoted to broadcast excerpts which include various public bulletins and reports on the following events: the evacuation of London schools (Aug. 31, 1939); British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's ultimatum to Adolf Hitler (Sept. 3, 1939); the Norwegian campaign (April and May 1940); the resignation of Chamberlain and the appointment of Winston Churchill as prime minister of Great Britain (May 10, 1940); the evacuation of Dunkirk (June 1940); interviews with Royal Air Force pilots; London air raids (Aug. and Sept. 1940); Christmas in wartime London (Dec. 24, 1940); the African campaign (Nov. 7, 1942); the fourth Christmas of the war (Dec. 24, 1942); Murrow recalling his experiences on a bombing mission over Berlin (Dec. 3, 1943); D-Day (June 6, 1944); Murrow's return to Germany (April 1945); and his impressions about his visit to the Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald as the camp was being liberated (April 11, 1945).

Cataloging of this program was made possible by Michael Finkelstein and Sue-ann Friedman, 1996.

Details

  • NETWORK: CBS
  • DATE: February 24, 1946 Sunday
  • RUNNING TIME: 0:50:24
  • COLOR/B&W:
  • CATALOG ID: R85:0255
  • GENRE: Radio - News
  • SUBJECT HEADING: Berlin, Germany - 1943
  • SERIES RUN: CBS - Radio, 1946
  • COMMERCIALS:

CREDITS

    • Edward R. Murrow … Writer , Narrator, Reporter
    • Neville Chamberlain
    • Winston S. Churchill
    • David Lloyd George
    • Adolf Hitler