2017 TV Noir si

TV Noir: Let There Be Dark

The Paley Center presents a screening series TV Noir: Let There Be Dark---television programs that embrace the aesthetic, formal, and/or thematic preoccupations associated with the classic noir films from 1940s and 1950s Hollywood.

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David Bowie: Sound & Vision

This screening exhibition is a tribute to the extraordinary legacy of David Bowie, showcasing the iconic musician’s pioneering work in music video, rarely-seen performances, outtakes, documentaries, and interviews.

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The U.S. Olympic Archive, presented by Gordon Crawford

Explore the comprehensive, publicly accessible video archive of Olympic television coverage at the Paley Center in New York and Los Angeles. The U.S. Olympic Archive, digitally archived to ensure its preservation for future generations, spans the televised history of the Games—from the 1960 Olympic Winter Games in Squaw Valley through the 2012 Olympic Games in London.

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Media's Role in the Cuban Missile Crisis

This month marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, one of the most important events in the evolution of television.

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A Short History of Drugs (On TV)

In honor of Breaking Bad's upcoming series conclusion, we're looking back to explore some TV moments that reflected and defined the role of drugs in American life.

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Nick ‘90s: All That, and More, for the Children of the Nineties

What are your favorite Nickelodeon shows from the golden age of the 1990s?

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Spy vs. Spy (vs. Spy vs. Spy … )

What is the best television spy show of all time?

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The Live Coverage of the March on Washington

A look at how Martin Luther King, Jr.'s historic "I Have A Dream" Speech (which happened on August 28, 1963) was covered on TV at the time.

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From Alternative To Mainstream: Careers of '90s Sketch Comedy Legends

As part of the New York Comedy Festival, we celebrate the 20th anniversary of The Ben Stiller Show, a short-lived but influential sketch program that expressed a new sensibility in the comedy world in the 1990s usually called “Alternative Comedy.” The revolution was televised.

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24 Moments that Defined Jack Bauer

As we enjoy some summer beach time and await the return of Fox's thriller 24 next year, let's take a look at the defining moments of 24's hero Jack Bauer.

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Paley Center TV Mixtapes

Because we like you. Compilations from our collection. Every month the Paley Center will present special screenings culled from our massive collection, curated to provide a unique viewing experience.

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The 9/11 Special Collection

The Paley Center has worked with broadcasters from all over the world to gather news coverage relating to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. We are preserving 1000 hours from around the world.

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TV: The Movie

In honor of the 35th anniversary of the classic TV satire film Network, what is your favorite movie about TV?

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A Decade Later: The Paley Center for Media Remembers September 11

The Paley Center’s 9/11 media-themed programming revisits the events of that day not just to commemorate, but also to take stock of how we have changed and what we have learned.

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12 Great Halloween Programs

There are lots of Halloween TV lists out there, but this is the one that counts, from the wizards in the Paley Center's curatorial department. They get that TV is Halloween's greatest promoter.

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JFK Assassination & TV: Lesser-Known Facts and Thoughts from Paley Curatorial

The Paley Center commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy with a look at some of the lesser-known facts about the media coverage of the national tragedy and rare TV footage.

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The Beatles Meet “Collective Depression”? Think Again

The Beatles rocked our media landscape in 1964 when more than seventy-three million people tuned into The Ed Sullivan Show on Sunday, February 9, 1964, for their debut American appearance. Why did so many people watch this relatively unknown British band one Sunday night fifty years ago?