Videoconferencing

The Paley Center offers classes via videoconferencing on a wide variety of topics that have been developed and are conducted by the Paley Center's education staff. Classes include clips from the collection that provide information, stimulate conversation, and encourage active viewing and critical thinking. Pre- and post-visit educational materials provide additional thematically relevant information and extend the learning experience. To determine which class fits your needs, please read through the description, pre- and post-visit activities, and scheduling information.

Videoconference classes are sixty minutes long, unless otherwise noted, but can be modified to accommodate class periods. For the most effective learning experience, we recommend that the class size not exceed 40 participants.  Videoconference classes cost $125 and staff development workshops cost $150. Schools can participate by connecting to the Paley Center with an IP (H.323) line, or Zoom Pro account. To schedule a videoconference program for your students or staff, call 212.621.6600 or email distancelearningny@paleycenter.org.

 

Grades 1–3

Fractured Fairy Tales

What happens when you take a classic fairy tale, mix up the storytelling elements and throw in a little imagination and creativity? The answer might be found by watching The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show, popular in the 1960s, which frequently included short cartoons called, “Fractured Fairy Tales”. These shorts used zany techniques and hilarious devices to transform traditional fairy tales into something completely different. In this class for young learners, students will review the basic elements of storytelling before viewing and discussing a variety of wacky, imaginative, and untraditional fairy tales from the Paley Center collection.

Grades 3-5

Around the World

Explore the many different ways people live, work, and play in countries around the world like Brazil, Malaysia, and the Philippines. By viewing programs from our celebrated International Children’s Television Festival and discussing them, students will compare their own lives to those of children elsewhere and consider how the natural environment and local customs shape and influence people's lives.

All classes are interactive, with guided discussion designed to encourage active observation and critical thinking.

Grades 4–7

Tooned In to Animation

Experience the magic of animation and learn about the process behind one of television's most creative forms. Students will watch a series of clips and have the chance to create their own flip books.

All classes are interactive, with guided discussion designed to encourage active observation and critical thinking.

Grades 5–12

The Fine Art of Persuasion: Television and Advertising

What is advertising, what is its goal, and what are its methods? How do images and sounds combine to make a point or sell a product, and how have these changed over time? Through careful analysis, students will discover the persuasive techniques developed to capture a viewer's attention in order to promote a product or idea.

All classes are interactive, with guided discussion designed to encourage active observation and critical thinking.

Grades 7–12

Hitchcock: Master of Suspense

Alfred Hitchcock enlivened the suspense genre with tongue-in-cheek introductions, macabre humor, and twist endings. In this workshop students analyze Hitchcock's use of the ordinary to create exciting, even frightening, television drama.

All classes are interactive, with guided discussion designed to encourage active observation and critical thinking.

Grades 8–12

Portrayals of Women on Television

Students will examine how portrayals of women on television have evolved from the 1950s to the present. This class encourages participants to think about women they admire and to compare them to these fictional portrayals.

All classes are interactive, with guided discussion designed to encourage active observation and critical thinking.

Grades 9–12

The Thirty-Second Candidate: Political Advertising on Television

This class uses the Paley Center's collection of political advertisements from the past fifty years to illustrate how candidates attempt to win the hearts, minds, and votes of the American people. Students will focus on techniques of political advertising, target audience and demographics, how advertising conveys leadership, and the role of policy in campaign ads.

All classes are interactive, with guided discussion designed to encourage active observation and critical thinking.

Grades 9–12

Get Up! Stand Up! The Civil Rights Movement and Television

In the years between 1954 and 1965, more legislation was passed, more court decisions were rendered, and more social change was effected in the name of civil rights than ever before. The rise of the Civil Rights Movement paralleled the growing use of television in the United States. In 1950 television was still in its infancy, but by 1960, televisions were present in 90 percent of American homes. Television provided the American public with a means to witness the struggle for civil rights nearly in real time and led a more informed society to enact social change.

Grades 10–12

Red Scare: The Cold War & Television

During the 1950s television emerged as the most powerful mass medium since the invention of the printing press. At this time, America was gripped with fear and anxiety about the possibilities of war and nuclear threat, and television reflected this paranoia. Through close examination of 1950s television, including news, public service announcements, documentaries, and science fiction programming, this class investigates the ways that television reflected and perpetuated fear and hysteria during the Cold War period, a pivotal moment in modern history.

Senior Citizens

The Golden Years of Television

Between the late '40s and early '60s the medium of television became the dominant form of home entertainment. With only a few hours of programming a day, people excitedly tuned-in to see what this new technology would bring into their living rooms. This presentation revisits and celebrates some of the most beloved personalities from these early years in television.

Professional Training Workshop

Staff Development Workshops

This professional training workshop explores how to use television to enrich classroom curricula and stresses the importance of focused viewing and discussion when using audio/visual media as a teaching tool.

Pinnacle Award

Congratulations to The Paley Center for Media's Education department for earning the Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration's Pinnacle Award in recognition of outstanding videoconference programs. This award, presented annually, is based on teacher evaluations submitted through the CILC website, and recognizes outstanding performance by a content provider.

READ MORE